Dorayaki (Japanese “Pancake” Sandwich)

Dorayaki is a delicious Japanese snack or confection which traditionally consists of a sweet red bean paste (anko) sandwiched between two ‘pancakes’. Slightly different versions of the recipe may be found on several blogs but this is the first one I ran across some time ago, on Nami’s “Just One Cookbook” site. It uses the Mochiko (sweet rice flour) that I mentioned in the previous post though I HAVE seen a recipe which used all purpose flour.

I made a half batch of the recipe, and, even though I forgot to add the water, which I figured out after the fourth pancake, I still ended up with some edible, though misshapen early results. The final six pancakes, after I added about half of the amount of water listed into the remaining batter, were perfect.

Dorayaki with Sweet Red Bean Paste

The pancakes are easy to make though you DO have to be careful about the cooking temperature (medium-low is definitely advised) since the sugar and honey can burn quite easily if you exceed the temperature suggested. Moderation in the amount of filling is also necessary. Too much and you won’t be able to shape the pancakes around it and gently ‘pinch’ the edges closed. I used a ‘coarse’ sweet bean paste with some bean pieces left in it to fill the pancakes. Definitely use the plastic wrap to help in the shaping.

  

I used red bean paste (purchased) for the filling, because I like the taste, but if you can’t get it or don’t like it, and want to try something else, a thick pastry cream, crunchy peanut butter and Nutella and very lightly sweetened whipped cream and fresh fruit are alternative fillings.

5 thoughts on “Dorayaki (Japanese “Pancake” Sandwich)

  1. What a lovely treat! I must try these.
    I had onigiri with spicy tuna at a sushi restaurant last night. I was less than impressed: lots of rice and a tiny bit of tuna smothered in spicy mayo. My husband had the same comment about ichiban tuna: skimpy on tuna with way too much mayo.

      1. We also eat out rarely, but this was a special occasion. I think that was just one of those days when the chef had a heavy hand with mayo. Onigiri was a new item on their menu, but my husband has had ichiban tuna there a couple of times and liked it. I think I’ll stick to my sashimi, though.

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