Tag Archives: whipped cream

No-Churn Blueberry Cheesecake Ice Cream

I’ve been doing some more freezer diving lately as a way of keeping grocery costs down and because the frost layer is pretty thick and I really NEED to defrost the poor thing. So, my recycled meals have been quick, tasty and filling (and, of course, economical) but not exactly post worthy. I’ll post a summary of this month’s meals shortly.

While rooting around in the depths, I ran across a clam-shell of blueberries, bought on sale a couple of months ago, and debated on lemon blueberry pound cake or muffins. I went with a no-churn blueberry cheesecake ice cream. The sweetened condensed milk (bought during the Xmas baking sales), along with the heavy whipping cream, will also help to clear out the fridge and pantry.

ETA: Sorry for the ‘not pretty’ picture below. I kept meaning to take a nicer one and then just devoured the rest of the ice cream without taking a single picture. (OOPS!!)

No-Churn Blueberry Cheesecake Ice Cream – makes ~4 cups

Ice cream base

NOTE: Recipe measures after the slash are based on using the smaller CDN can (300 ml) of sweetened condensed milk

2 cups heavy whipping cream/ ~ 1 1/2 cups
1 can (14oz) sweetened condensed milk/ 1 CDN can (10oz)
7 oz cream cheese, room temperature/ 5 oz
2 tsp vanilla extract / ~1 1/2 tsp

Blueberry swirl

2 cups fresh or frozen blueberries
3 tbsp sugar
2 tbsp lemon juice

Making the fruit swirl:

Combine the blueberries, sugar, and lemon juice in a pan over medium-high heat. Cook until the berries burst and release juices. You can crush some of the berries with your spoon or spatula to release more juices.

Let the berry mixture simmer for a few minutes, until the mixture thickens. Remove the pan from the heat, pour into a bowl, and stick your bowl in the fridge to chill. This is a good make ahead and the leftover ‘sauce’ makes a good topping for ice cream or pancakes.

Making the ice cream base:

In a VERY large bowl, beat your cream cheese with an electric mixer fitted with whisk/beater attachments until smooth.

Slowly add condensed milk and vanilla extract, and whisk the mixture until smooth.

Add the heavy cream and keep whisking until stiff peaks form. (This will take longer than usual due to the other ingredients. About 10 minutes is my estimate.) Spoon about half of your whipped cream mixture into a standard sized loaf pan.

Remove your chilled berry sauce from the fridge and spoon about half of it over your whipped cream mixture in the loaf pan. Blobs of sauce work. Don’t worry about making it pretty.

Cover with your remaining whipped cream mixture, and top with the rest of the berry mixture. Use a butter knife to drag/swirl your blueberry mixture into your cream mixture.

Cover the pan tightly with aluminum foil, and stick it in the freezer for about 6 hours, or until ice cream is firm enough to scoop. For a faster set, make the ice cream in 2 containers.

No Churn Dulce de Leche Ice Cream

I’m reposting this recipe by itself cause too many people seem to have missed it in its original Canada Day posting and it deserves a second look. I’m adding a couple of new pictures as well.

It was too blah and gray to bbq so I made chicken cutlets out of some of the boneless and skinless chicken breasts I bought on sale yesterday and served them with roasted potato wedges and a classic mojito. I finished the meal with no churn ice cream.

I’ve made ice cream before using the classic cooked egg custard and my inexpensive ice cream maker. It was very tasty, but time consuming to make, since you need to pre-chill your freezer container for a MINIMUM of 24 hrs…72 is much better. And you have to make your custard mixture the day before and refrigerate it at least overnight before churning it.

As with no-knead bread, I thought the concept seemed too good to be true. All you need is sweetened condensed milk, whipping/heavy cream and flavourings. And time, of course. You have to let your mixture freeze for at least 6 hours or all you get is a milkshake.

I had a can of dulce de leche flavoured sweetened condensed milk, that I bought on sale a while ago, in the pantry … which would save having to buy the plain version. So I gave it a try.

After all, ice cream and summer go together.

Dulce de Leche No-Churn Ice Cream – 4 cups

350 ml (1 1/2 cups) cold whipping cream
250 ml (1 cup) dulce de leche-flavoured sweetened condensed milk
30 ml (2 tbsp) bourbon or whiskey
5 ml (1 tsp) pure vanilla extract

In a large bowl using an electric mixer, starting at low and gradually increasing speed to medium-high, whip the cream until stiff peaks form.

In medium bowl, combine the sweetened condensed milk, bourbon and vanilla extract. Gently but thoroughly fold whipped cream into the milk mixture, being careful not to deflate the cream. You can start by stirring in about a cup to lighten the condensed milk mixture and then fold in the rest.

Spoon the mixture into a metal loaf pan or any freezer-safe container, lay a sheet of plastic wrap directly on top of the ice cream and freeze for 6 hours or overnight. You can drizzle additional dulce de leche over the ice cream as you pour it into the container. In Canada, a can of dulce de leche contains 300 ml, so you’ll have about 50 ml to play with.

NOTE: I used 2 tbsp of my whiskey vanilla bean extract in place of the liquor/vanilla combo. I tried to fold the whipped cream into the condensed milk mixture as carefully as possible in order not to deflate it but I lost a LOT of volume. Hopefully you’ll do better.

Mini Pavlovas with Blood Orange Curd and Fresh Berries

This is a great make ahead recipe with only a few last minute steps to turn a simple (and inexpensive) meringue into an elegant dessert to serve to company. The Raspberry Eton Mess I made a while ago is another creative and delicious way of using meringues.

The addition of cornstarch and vinegar to the meringue mixture really makes a difference. The resulting ‘pav’ puffs up and is glossy and crisp on the outside and creamy/chewy on the inside.

The combination of whipped cream and curd (blood orange, this time) really takes this dessert to another level.

I chose to make mini pavlovas rather than a single, large pavlova as I was eating by myself and the finished dessert does NOT hold.

Pavlova with Blood Orange Curd and Fresh Berries – makes 8-10 servings

For the pavlova:

4 large egg whites, room temperature
a pinch of salt
1 cup regular white sugar
2 tsp cornstarch
1 tsp white vinegar
1/2 tsp vanilla sugar or extract

For the assembly:

1 cup of blood orange curd, made with 4 egg yolks
1 cup cold whipping cream
1 tbsp regular white sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla sugar or extract
1 1/2 cups fresh berries, such as raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, or sliced strawberries

Pre-heat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit and arrange a rack in the middle.

Preparing the baking sheet:

Using a 9-inch round cake pan, trace a circle onto a piece of parchment paper with a pen, pencil or marker. Flip the paper over and place it on a baking sheet (the traced circle should be visible); set aside.

Making the pavlovas:

Place the egg whites and salt in a clean, dry metal or glass bowl. Using a whisk attachment and a hand or stand beater, beat on medium speed until the whites begin to lighten in color and only small bubbles remain, about 2 minutes.

Increase the speed to high and add the sugar a tablespoon at a time or pour in gradually in a stream. (If using vanilla sugar, add it to the white sugar at this point.) Whisk until firm, shiny peaks form, resembling marshmallow cream, about 3 minutes.

Sift the cornstarch through a fine-mesh strainer into the meringue.

Drizzle the vinegar and vanilla extract (if using this form) over the top and fold them into the meringue with a rubber or silicone spatula until no streaks of vanilla remain, being careful not to deflate the egg whites.

Using the spatula, pile the meringue into the center of the circle drawn on the parchment paper and smooth it to the edges of the circle to form a rough, even disk about 1 inch tall.

Place the baking sheet in the oven and turn the heat down to 300 degrees Fahrenheit. Bake until the meringue is firm to the touch but slightly soft in the middle, about 60 minutes. Remove from the oven, place the baking sheet on a wire rack, and let cool completely. Run a thin metal spatula under the meringue to loosen.

Carefully slide it onto a serving platter or cake stand. Set aside while beating the whipping cream.

The assembly:

Place the cream, sugar, and vanilla in a clean, dry metal or glass bowl. Beat on medium-high speed until soft peaks form, about 1 1/2 to 2 minutes.

Remove the bowl and, using a rubber spatula, fold the chilled blood orange curd into the whipped cream, leaving big streaks of curd and whipped cream.

Pile the mixture into the center of the baked meringue and spread it to the edges.

Top with the fresh berries and serve the pavlova immediately.

For 8 mini pavlovas:

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. You’ll need TWO baking sheets. Center two shelves in the oven.  Line each sheet with parchment paper. On each paper, draw 4 x 4 inch circles. Divide the meringue evenly among the circles, make a bit of a hollow in the middle. ( I only used 3 egg whites so I managed to squeeze 6 pavs on a single baking sheet)

Place in the oven and immediately turn the heat down to 300 degrees Fahrenheit. Bake for 30 minutes then turn the heat off and leave the meringues in the oven for another 30 minutes, in the turned off oven, to cool. Then cool the baking sheets on cooling racks until they come to room temperature.

Assemble as for full sized pavlova.

I had some of the cream and curd left over and poured it into a pretty glass … a great dessert all by itself.

Next time, I’ll make some wonton cups as I did in this earlier post cause the blood orange curd is REALLY really good. 🙂