Tag Archives: dim sum

Steamed Chinese BBQ’d Pork Buns

I first tasted these steamed buns in a Chinese restaurant more than 20 years ago and was determined to make them … ONE DAY.

That day has finally come.

I started out wanting to try the Mantou (Chinese steamed bun) recipe on the “Sprinkles and Sprouts” blog, but then I decided that if I was going to make the steamed dough, I might as well go all the way and make the steamed bbq’d pork buns. Yesterday, I made a batch of Chinese bbq’d pork (char siu), FINALLY cleaned and prepped my brand new bamboo steamer and tested the steamer set-up. And, this morning, after two cups of coffee and a green scallion pancake with sourdough starter to fortify me and put me in the mood for cooking Chinese food, I made these beauties.

Be sure to remove and cut open one of the buns to make sure your particular steaming temp/time has cooked them through

I’d probably make two changes if/when I make these again. First, I’d add a bit more sugar to the dough (25 g / 2 tbsp, increase to 37.5 g/ 3 tbsp) as the ones I’m familiar with have a sweeter taste. And, second, I’d make them a bit smaller (70-75 g, reduce to 50 g) cause they crowded my steamer when done. I don’t know if that’s why they also took longer to steam than expected. The finished buns were about 9 cm/ 3 1/2 inches in diameter.

Cha-Shu Pork/Char Siu Pork/Chinese BBQ’d Pork

2 lbs boneless center cut pork loin (Boston Butt preferred)**
2 tbsp hoisin sauce
2 tbsp shoyu (soy sauce)
1 1/2 tbsp mirin (rice wine)
2 1/2 tbsp sugar
1 tsp 5-spice powder
1 tsp salt
1 tbsp ketchup
1 tsp finely minced garlic (or 1/4 tsp garlic powder)
1/4 tsp dried onion powder (new)
1/2 tsp dried ginger

** I only had about 0.7 lb (320 gm) of pork loin but I used the full recipe of marinade.

Remove most of the fat and gristle from the pork loin and discard. Cut meat with grain into strips about 1 1/2-2 inches wide and 1 inch thick. Combine hoisin sauce, shoyu, mirin, sugar, salt, ketchup, 5-spice powder, ginger, garlic and onion powder in a bowl. Add meat. Coat well. Marinate at least 4 hours, or overnight.

If intending to baste with the marinade you used for the raw pork, pour it into a small saucepan and bring to a boil, cooking 2-3 minutes at a full rolling boil.

Barbecue until just barely done as carry-over cooking time will continue the process or broil in the oven.

Broiler Method:

Turn on the broiler.

Raise the oven rack to the middle of the oven (3 shelves) or to the 2nd level from the top if you have a 4 shelf oven.

Arrange the pork on a rack on a cookie sheet. If you want to reduce the mess, line the cookie sheet with foil (and also put foil on the rack, using a knife to cut through the foil where the openings in the rack are so the juices and marinade can drip through onto the pan). Pour about 1 cup of water into the cookie sheet or broiler pan. It’s not guaranteed to be entirely mess free, but it should reduce the mess significantly.

Prop the door of the oven open with a wooden spoon. Broil for 10-15 minutes per side or until the meat is barely cooked through and the outside edges have charred a bit.

For the filling:

Pour the marinade from the bbq’d pork into a saucepan, bring to the boil and then simmer for 5 minutes. Remove some to a separate bowl and use it to baste the pork on each side.

Combine the rest of the cooked marinade with the cooled diced pork, a couple of tablespoons of water, 2 tsp oyster sauce, 1 tsp hoisin sauce, a pinch of white pepper and 2 sliced green onions and cook at medium-low for a couple of minutes. Then cool.

 

Mantou/Bao Dough and Finished Buns

Dim sum (March break)

Before March break, I treated myself to a belated birthday meal of dim sum. All my usual favourites and a couple of my nephew’s as he’s been away at school so our regular get-togethers have been eliminated. My nephew usually orders the steamed sweet filled buns but I gave them a pass. I think I only had 9 dishes instead of my usual 10-12 as there are no steamed or baked bbq’d pork buns pictured, for example.

Stuffed green peppers with a black bean sauce. I usually order a plate … it’s my ‘healthy’ green dish.

Taro and mixed meat dumpling … it looks like a fuzzy football when the taro fries up. My nephew loves the bacon wrapped shrimp with mayo dipping sauce. We have to order two plates when we go together, cause he doesn’t like to share. Sometimes, he takes a plate home for his mom.

Beef short ribs and bean curd wrapped steamed rolls

Steamed shrimp rice noodles and garlic squid. Another type of roll in the back but fried. A close-up of the squid … I usually gobble it up piping hot and have been known, on rare occasions, to share but usually it’s all for me.

Steamed sticky rice packages and the fried rolls mentioned earlier.

Baked Chinese Buns and other stuff

WARNING: Picture Heavy Post

I’ve been doing quite a bit of cooking from my freezer these days due to necessity. No money and free time means I can get creative.

I love dim sum and one of my favourite dishes is char siu bao or Chinese bbq’d pork buns. I was going to use the Korean pork tenderloin for a filling but I was too lazy to do so when I had a  container of Jamaican beef patty filling in the freezer, so I used that instead. I ended up making 2 batches (24 buns total) to use up all the thawed filling. Next time I’ll try for something more traditional with my own Chinese bbq’d pork. The buns were a definite winner.

Char Siu Bao Dough – makes 12 x 1 1/2 oz buns

2 1/4 tsp (1 package) of dried yeast
1/4 cup sugar
1/2 cup warm water
2 cups (280 gm/10 oz) plain flour
1 egg, slightly beaten
3 tbsp oil
1/2 tsp salt

Egg wash: 1 egg beaten with 1 tsp cold water

Shaping the Buns:

Place the sugar and warm water in a small bowl, mix until the sugar has dissolved. Add yeast and leave it for 10 – 15 minutes until it becomes all frothy.

Sift flour into a large bowl.

Add the yeast mixture, beaten egg, oil and salt and stir. Bring the flour mixture together with a fork or your hands.

Place the dough on a lightly floured surface and knead for approximately 10 minutes. Use as little flour as possible for kneading. The dough should be smooth and slightly elastic.

Place the dough in a lightly oiled bowl and cover with a damp cloth. Leave to rise until it is double in size. This will take from 1 – 2 hours depending on the temperature in your kitchen.

Once dough has doubled in size transfer to a working surface over which you’ve scattered some flour. Deflate the dough a bit and divide into 12 equal portions. Shape into round balls.

You can use a rolling pin to roll out the dough to approximately 8cm (3 inches) in diameter. Then pick the piece of dough up and gently pull the edges to enlarge to about 10cm (4 inches) in diameter. (By doing this it keeps the dough slightly thicker in the centre. This means that when your buns are cooking they won’t split on the top.)

Place a good sized tbsp of filling on the dough circle. Then gather the edges and seal your bun.

NOTE: Alternatively, press the ball of dough down with the heel of your palm, put the stretched dough into your left hand and add the filling. Use the thumb of your left hand to press down on the filling while using the thumb and first two fingers of your right hand to draw the edges of the dough up around the filling.

Place the bun sealed side down on your baking sheet. Continue with the rest of the dough. (You can press down on the balls gently so the bun won’t be too bread-y on the top and the filling will more centered. See picture below. ) Once all the buns are finished, brush the surface with egg wash.

Place in a preheated oven of 400º F for 15-18 minutes or until golden brown.

The buns went well with a freshly made bowl of creamy turkey and wild rice soup.

A few other goodies made this month: Raisin butter tarts and a couple of mini pies, coconut panna cotta with a blueberry sauce or a simple apricot jam base and a quince paste garnish.

I used the extra blueberry sauce for a filling for a couple of blueberry-raspberry mini pies. The filling for the fruit pies was thickened with a cornstarch slurry and cooked together with a handful of frozen raspberries before being allowed to cool. The pastry for the tarts and pies were made with Tenderflake lard pastry from the freezer.

And lest you think it was all about the sweets … here are some other tasty dishes.

Chorizo sausage, jalapeno cheese and cheddar cornbread … with leftover turkey potato gnocchi soup

Salmon in roasted tomato and pesto marinara over fettuccine

Pork chops – either simmered in a cream of mushroom gravy or breaded and pan fried

And then, there’s always a pizza or two. In this case, the last of the whole wheat sourdough dough from my freezer.

Washed down with a refreshing beer, in this case a Japanese Sapporo.